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Nintendo launches program for schools with focus on STEM

In an Australian first, Nintendo Australia has launched a program in Australian schools. The program will let kids get hands-on with the Nintendo Switch and Nintendo Labo. The idea is to teach them about the basics of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

Nintendo Labo in class

We’ve come a long way from fighting over who gets to use the one or two computers in the classroom to play Magic School Bus or Lemmings games. Especially with workshops being run in classrooms using Nintendo Labo to create the various kits on offer… like the fishing rod or piano, among others. The program will give kids a hands-on way to interact and build various systems. They’ll also learn how they interact with each other in a fun and innovative way.

Image: http://trade-media.com.au/news/read/nintendo-launches-australian-first-school-program/

The most exciting prospect is the use of Toy-Con Garage. Kids will be able to develop their own games and experiment with how to put together various scenarios. They’ll use the Labo and Switch in tandem while also offering a basic introduction to programming.

The program will target almost 800 students initially with hopes to expand to more schools in the future. The expansion will allow them to teach more kids and help them get an interest in not only gaming but also the STEM fields. STEM is a big focus for education at the moment, with 75% of jobs predicted to need the use of STEM by 2026 according to a study by the Australian Government, Department of Industry, Innovation and Science in 2016.

Thoughts from Nintendo

Managing Director of Nintendo Australia, Kamon Yoshimura, had this to say:

“We also hope that Nintendo Switch bringing Nintendo Labo to life will provide a fun and exciting way for kids to explore basic STEAM topics together while building a fundamental understanding of the technology behind them.”

It’s always exciting to see kids take an interest in STEM. And, video games on top of that adds that extra interactive element. Here’s hoping it’s a huge success.

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